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not realize this huge trade deficit we have. half of it historical has been energy products, mostly oil. if you get to the point where you are a self-sufficient producer -- i am glad you said north american energy independent. i always disliked the idea of this national energy independence. if you become energy self- sufficient, you eliminate half the trade deficit. this really changes the balance of payments and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all ar
and more powerful storms. the path toward sustainable energy sources will belong and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must leave it. we cannot cede this, must climates prague -- its promise. that is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national parks, forests, waterways, snowcapped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care. that is what will lend meaning to the creek our fathers once declared. >> there was a lot of time spent on climate change. was that a surprise? guest: i think people expected climate change to get a shout out along with immigration, gun control the environment of trinity was really been very surprised challenge mentioning god. it got a huge and a huge chunk of time, almost more than any other policy issues. that was a real surprise. host: it was an issue we did not hear a lot about on the campaign .rail paria guest: that was by design. his advisers have made it clear that they did not see that as winning -- as a winning campaign issue. although it is something the president did care about, it
of the working class. today, if you want to control the energy in the united states, cap and trade, you want to shut down the coal industry, you want to suppress the new fracking technique which has produced a bonanza in gas and oil, then you do in the name of the planet, global warming. it allows a political class of experts, central government, to control economic lever is in a way that was done in the past in the name of the working class. >> i hear from people who know about this stuff that say we're headed towards energy independence. >> unless the epa stops us. >> charles, this is not as bad as all that. he wants to replace the national anthem with the international. >> he does talk about climate change. >> he talks about the science of climate change it and i'm talking about the president. >> i am talking about the president, too. he is the inaugural address to signal, this is what we have to deal with. this will not be accomplished in the next four years. it is important to begin this subject. you can argue about how it is done, but it will be addressed. >> science seems to be, overw
, every day we're using more and more energy. the world needs more energy. where's it going to come from? ♪ ♪ that's why right here in australia, chevron is building one of the biggest natural gas projects in the world. enough power for a city the size of singapore for 50 years. what's it going to do to the planet? natural gas is the cleanest conventional fuel there is. we've got to be smart about this. it's a smart way to go. ♪ ♪ >> we were taking firee everywhere. i remember hearing the bullets going by me and hitting the ground hasbeside me. i shot one guy and saw him fall. >> the first woman since 1992 to receive the silverer star. this does nomean that they will b be serving in army and marine corps infantry units right away? >> there is a three-year interval. this was recommended unanimously by the joint cefs of staff. there have been 280,000 wowomen that have served in theaters in afghanistan and iraq over the past decade, but ere are fundamental questions about infantry where one of the tests historically, th has been given is that you can lift and carr
out of energy. there are five piles, and i cannot get myself to clean it. >> do you have hefty bags? how do you clean when you clean the closets? do you just get rid of it? >> i used to do that, and then i would miss things, and then i would have remorse, so now i just move it around to different spots. >> i want to tell you something that we're going to do tomorrow. >> oh, really? >> meredith is going to bring in her favorite pair of pants, and you guys, these are classics and her favorite shirt. >> i'm not doing this. >> you have to do it. >> they're pajama pants. they're not like pants they're pa jama pants. >> laura, who works in our hair and makeup department said she was helping you pack one day, and she saw these shredded, crazy looking pants and wondered what they were. >> they're sentimental pants. you'll see. now you've embarrassed me. i'll bring them in. what did you do? >> i'm exhausted. look at me. bloodshot. i was last night with andy cohen on his show "watch what happens live." >> he is here today. >> what you are going to do. >> i want to do that. >> you're going to
the consumer coming back as well. when you add all of this together, the improvement in the energy sector, foreign economy starting to do a little bit better, i think the stock market do well in the second term. just not as good as the first. connell: what if they mess it up again in washington? we will go into another round of negotiations, maybe we won't, on the debt ceiling. maybe we go over one of them. you have to take that into account. how does that change your odds taking capability as you look at the markets? >> you do have to take it into account. no question. maybe we will get beyond some of this and the first half of this year. at least enough to allow us to look beyond it. i think between now and then, no question we will be dealing with these deadlines coming up in the next few months. connell: do you still buy stocks? our stocks at the place be? it will be very interesting to see what happens with interest rates. you talked about that accommodative federal reserve that is there. there will be this push / pull on that side of it. >> i do think market rates will be drifting h
is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury with agriculture -- atta boy -- ag does and the treasury department does, and i think there is much more that we can do to augment our engagement in the private sector and their desires and needs abroad. i will give you an example. when i was in hong kong and number of years ago i met with our commercial service people. we had three of them. three people in hong kong. and they said they were overwhelmed. they had no ability to be given to mary rfp from china cummins writ with other countries. france was there, germany, england, others were much more aggressive in their promotion of their companies. and that is the world we are living in today. so i think we have to be much more aggressive in that respect. it's not an expenditu
a packed house. and an energy not seen since last season. >> it was packed when we walked in. and that's the way it should be. this place needs the sharks and the sharks need them so it's a win-win. reporter>> downtown restaurants and bars are expecting a busy weekend as well. the same or similar circumstances shrarbg -- the sharks have back to back home gains on saturday and sunday and just like today they hope for a win. matt keller, ktvu. >>> our joe fonzi has been keeping an eye on the sharks and he will have the highlights in sports. >>> a lithium battery shows signs of short circuiting. inside a lab, ntsb analysts are dissecting that charred battery piece by piece. it caught fire earlier this month inside a boeing dream liner inside of logan airport. >> we do not expect to see fire events on board aircrafts. there are multiple systems to protect against a battery event like this. those systems did not work as intended. we need to understand why. >> all 50 boeing dream liners have been grounded worldwide while investigators look at the problem. >>> a 13-year-old girl told police
. >> thank you for coming. for more than 30 years they served our country. during the energy natural resources committee a though. we are continuing to spend almost $400 billion a year to buy oil. and your colleague, senator lugar for a long time has told us the only way to beat a cartel is through competition and is sponsored and open feel standard to make a competitive market to move automobiles of drugs, whether it's not banal or whatever to have a market so when you drive a to the pump you have a choice in the price goes down. what do you think? do you think that's a good idea? at your colleague on, he saw stuart country. with a competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> the technology developments and fracturing has become that competitive instrument that is causing that to happen. we had the great fortune of this technology that is going to put this in a completely different position than in the past. i don't think we need to -- we see me after to develop the sources of energy. they can't be competitive because of the new discoveries of oil and gas through shale that is a tot
: the drought situation, its impact on food prices and energy prices. our two guests will be here and our phone lines are divided regionally. let's go back to some of the numbers. production decreases and apples, asparagus, coffee, increases in peanuts, dry beans, barley, oats, wheat, and potatoes. guest: when you look at the crops that had significant decreases first, we had a mild winter, a late freeze behind that. that hurts the past zero crop, and asparagus, we have seen a continual decline in acreage. 9.7% decrease is acreage-base. poor pollination in washington state. grapefruit production is down 7.4%. we had high dropout rate-- high drought rates in florida. " weather affected strawberry production, primarily in california. host: chuck abbott, how does this compare to previous years? guest: on the major field crops, there was a major impact. wheat farmers were lucky in that their major variety is winter wheat. they were able to harvest the crop before the drought hit. because they were encouraged to grow more wheat, they escaped the brunt of the drought. corn production was down signifi
the energy demand and energy supply and infrastructure deficit is there. and you know, we see, you know, doubling of energy demand over the next decade. and that's going to continue fueling the name for -- >> you see that sort of energy demand then. how are you reacting in terms of what your investment strategy is going to be, your production strategy? >> we've been in asia for just over 40 years. and leighton is one of the few companies with a full economic footprint off of asia. we continue to export services where we can extract value. we're excited about the opportunities we see, especially in countries such as indonesia. >> just talk about australia. we heard inflation, a little weaker than expected today. mr. swann from rbc says there's potentially room to cut rates. do you think they need to? what's your view of the economy? >> i think the big issue for us that we're seeing affecting a lot of businesses is the strong australian dollar. and i think companies need to adjust to a new norm of having a stronger dollar and what does that mean and how can we make ourselves sustainable.
-policy is defined by food security, energy security, he monetary assistance, the fight against disease and the push for development. as much as it is by any single counterterrorism initiative. new mexico must be. it is defined by leadership -- and it must be. it is defined by leadership. speaking out for the prisoners in north korea or millions of refugees in displaced persons or victims of human trafficking. it is defined by keeping faith with all of our troops who sacrificed to secure afghanistan. america lives up to her values when we give voice to the voiceless. i share with the president the conviction that it is equally imperative that we assert a new role in the world of increasing failed and failing states. burgeoning populations of young people hungry for jobs, opportunity, individual rights, and freedom are rebelling against years of disenfranchisement and humiliation. a fruit vendor in tunisia who ignited the arab awakening want to dignity and respect. he wanted to sell his fruit without corruption and abuse. that is what led him to itself in the late. the youth of tehrir square represen
that with the consent of the senate, i will do everything in my power, summon all my energy and focus to build on her record and on the president's vision. senator mccain, as he mentioned, is a longtime friend. we met here in the senate coming from very different political positions and perspectives, but, you know, we found common ground. i will never forget standing with him in hanoai, in the cell which he spent many years of his life listening to him talk about that experience. i will always be grateful for his partnership in helping to make real peace with vietnam by establishing the most significant process in the history of our country or in any country, for the accounting of missing and dead in any war. and then for working to lift the embargo and ultimately normalize relations with an old enemy. john had every reason to hate, but he didn't and instead we were able to help heal deep wounds and end the war that had divided too many people for much too long. as we talk about war and peace and foreign policy, i want all of us to keep in our minds, as i think we do, the extraordinary men and women
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
's a game changer. ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ >>> we're back. political director and chief white house correspondent chuck todd will take us inside the numbers of the latest poll as you tee up the second term, chuck. >> four years ago, enormous expectations for president obama. there were a lot of people, hope and change was big. this time, call it pragmatic hope as far as the public is concerned. as you see here, just less than 30% believe they're going to evaluate presi
of this disease, depending on the variation of protein energy malnutrition that we see, can be as high as 30 to 50%. usually the children die from routine infections like diarrhea or pneumonia. in fact, pneumonia is the most common cause of death. children who are severely malnourished appear anorexic. they do not want to eat. they're often very depressed. their heads are low. they stop talking. they stop walking, and they're severely dehydrated and suffering from infectious diseases. perhaps the most extreme case of malnutrition the team witnessed was annis-- a tiny wisp of a girl, two and a half years old. annis is just skin and bones and a head. and i looked at her, and i looked at the weight, and i asked the mother how old she is and the mother told me. and i said, "it's not possible." so i took annis myself back to weigh. i saw the scale, it said 4.2 kilos, took annis off, measured her height, put her back on the scale. i still couldn't believe it. it was amazing to me that annis was still alive. the highest mortality for children so severely malnourished occurs in the first few days. if you
that energy in a very constructive way to support incumbents that we have, particularly in those tough districts or states that we can barely hold on to, like a georgia. i mean, that seat could come in play, depending who that nominee is. and the party has to give that some great consideration. >> that substantive critique from you and the different strands of substantive critique about what happened in 2012 and what is wrong inside the party and the structure of the party makes it so remarkable to me that reince priebus was unopposed. i find it astonishing. >> yeah, me too. >> michael steele, msnbc analyst, former chairman of the party, thank you for your time tonight. it's great to see you back. >> all right, rachel. >>> president obama has made his choice to run the s.e.c. the agency that is supposed to police wall street. there are very few people, like maybe zero people who know more about the nominee or the job of the nominee than our special guest tonight, former new york governor and attorney general elliott spitser is here. yes! stay tuned. impact life expectancy in the u.s.,
. >>> algerian government officials have reassured foreign energy companies that they'll deal aggressively with terrorism. but a hostage crisis that left dozens of people from different counts dead is raising fears on new infrastructure. algerian prime minister abdel mal eck sellal. the militants attacked a natural gas plant in the desert last week and took hundreds of workers hostage. sellal stressed government forces moved in on the facility to demonstrate algeria will not give in to terrorism. a spokesperson for the militants told the french weekly "paris match" that the group had achieved 90% of its goals. one of those goals was to take control of a heavily guarded complex with just 40 fighters. but there are allegations that militants had some inside help. an algerian newspaper reported that security officials are questioning workers. they reveal a former driver at the facility was among the attackers. he reportedly provide the the group with detailed information about the plant. the militants have pledged to continue theirttks unless france halts its military campaign in mali. now, l
're on the energy and resources committee also, we are continuing to send almost $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil, and your colleague senator lugar, for a long time has told us that the only way to beat a cartel is through competition and he sponsored what is called an open-fuel standard. to basically make a competitive market to move automobiles, trucks, whether it's electricity or ethanol or whatever, to have a market so that brazil, when you drive up to the pump you have a choice and the price goes down, we think. do you think that's a good idea? and with your colleague gone now and the loss to our country would you be support i have of the competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> i think the technology developments and -- has become that competitive. that is causing that to happen. we had the great fortune of this technology that breakthrough take is going to put us in a different position than we've been in the past. i don't think -- we have seen the effort to try to determine and development alternative competitive because the discovery of oil and gas through shale and shale and thr
to committing all of my energies to working with the other commissioners and extremely talented and dedicated men and women of the staff of the sec, to fulfill the agencies mission to protect investors and ensure the strength, efficiency, and transparency of our capital markets. the sec, long a vital and positive force for our markets, has a lot of hard and important work ahead of it. i would welcome the opportunity to lead those efforts and build on the work of chairman mary schapiro and chairman elisse walter, who i am very honored is present today. finally and most importantly, i want to thank my husband, who is here today on what is our 43rd wedding anniversary -- >> today? >> today -- for his strong support of me in seeking to engage this public service. thank you very much. >> thank you. richard. >> thank you, mr. president, for the confidence you have placed in me and the team at the consumer financial protection bureau. we understand that our mission is to stand on the side of consumers -- our mothers and fathers, sisters and brothers, sons and daughters -- and see that they are treat
in productivity in the real economy. energy, telecom and the banking system. we have now a strong banking system but is not lending enough, particularly the small and medium sized companies. so this productivity reforms are the focus of economic policy these days. of course, it's a challenging environment. but i think it's something that is quite possible to happen. >> i was looking at some numbers and nearly 1% gdp growth this year is the target for growth in mexico. that's four times the pace of brazil. double the united states. because of that, you're seeing this huge inflow in money and business activity. are those targets accurate? >> yeah. i think this year we should be in the range between 3 1/2 and 4% growth. and it is a good growth rate if you compare it with other countries in the world with some latin countries in the continent. but it's not enough. mexico is still an emerging country. we have a substantial amount of people still in poverty. and we need the to grow faster and at a steady te that's why productivity is so important. and we have fantastic samples of competitive in mexico
to school. nathan. tadpole. and help ensure a constant supply of clean energy. the things we build share one belief. that the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. for their "destination wedding." double miles you can "actually" use. but with those single mile travel cards... [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" marks the spot she'll never sit. but i bought a dress! a toast... ...to the capital one venture card. fly any airline, any flight, anytime. double miles you can actually use. what a coincidence? what's in your wallet? [ all screaming ] watch the elbows ladies. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >> a facebook ad and the supreme court justice's hat topping our media moments. first, greg abbott posting an invitation to new york gu
has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to the second half of "outfront." we start with stories we care about where we focus on reporting from the front lines and we begin with the secretary of state hillary clinton tomorrow. she is testifying finally about the attack on the american consulate in benghazi. now, officials tell us she will address concerns about weak security at u.s. diplomatic posts and will answer, quote, every question asked of her. among those questioning her, republican representative chris smith of the foreign relations committee. he tells "outfront" he wants to know if clinton was aware of the request for security upgrades at the consulate. we will speak to the congressman tomorrow to see if he is satisfied with the secretary's answer. >>> we have an "outfront" update on the artistic director of the bol
, renewable energy, reducing gun violence, and building an economy that last -- get this -- from the middle out. for all these reasons, and many more, it gives me great pleasure to second the nomination of congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz to serve a second term at the helm of the democratic national committee. [applause] >> thank you. the chair now recognizes a member of the dnc spanish cauc caucus, for another session and speech. by the way, i'm not trying to hog the stage. if you want to come up here, feel welcome. >> i am okay. thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i am very honored. i come from the great state that gave you the most marvelous president, barack obama. [applause] >> i am also proud to join my fellow democrats nominating congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz for the chair of democratic national committee. while my home is illinois, florida is very close and dear to my heart. my family is smart enough to move out there 20 years ago, so i consider you my congresswoman, too. i've always, i thought of debbie wasserman schultz as my second congressman. it is my
, the gentleman given one minute. mr. poe: mr. speaker, there is good news about energy. we have untapped natural resources here at home. in the united states we have natural gas that can be turned into liquefies natural gas. other nations don't have this. we have so much natural gas that we can export it by selling it as l.n.g. not only will it bring money and energy back home, it will create jobs. this means jobs and capital for americans and american companies. even the department of energy says that expanded export of l.n.g. will benefit the united states' economy. in 2010, the oil and natural gas industry added $476 billion to our economy. to top it off, the oil and natural gas industry employs 9.2 million people in america. we are missing out on this opportunity by not exporting l.n.g. we have ignored this opportunity far too long. let's stop relying on middle eastern nations and use more natural gas and export it as l.n.g. that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana seek recognition? >> to add
to be to the point where we can bring this debt under control, a sound financial policy, energy independence in a way we've never thought about before. we're respected by the world again like we haven't been for the last 20 years. >> so are you ready to run against hifrl clinton in 2016? >> look, i haven't made that judgment and hillary hasn't made that judgment but i can tell you what, everything that should be done over the next two years that i should be part of would have to be done whether i run or i don't run. if this administration is successful, whoever is running as a better position to run, if we are not successful, whoever runs as a nominee is going to be less likely to win. >> gloria is here with this excellent interview. i know more is coming up. but he's being pretty cagy. >> you saw him on that parade route shaking everyone's hand. he saw him at the iowa caucuses. have you heard of those? >> new hampshire, he was involved with them as well. >> exactly. he's 70, looks great, very energetic. if i had to guess, i would guess he's running. but as he said, he doesn't have to make that decis
until they are 26. i worked very hard on that in the house energy and commerce committee, and pleased to see it in the final act. i'm wondering especially given that your testimony talks a lot of the age of many profound mental illnesses being between 16 to 25 op woodring url lardy observing the positive impact of the increased level of insurance for that age population that age cohort. >> we know the provision to allow young people to stay on their parents' insurance and the provision to prohibit exclusion from preexisting conditions both help young people with mental health and substance abuse disorders stay on and keep injured and be able to get access to insurance when they may not have access to it otherwise. millions of young people are covered through that process already come and i don't have a specific number but we know that those young people have these disorders are part of that group. >> thank you, senator. >> senator murkowski. >> thank you mr. chairman and i joined the rest of my colleagues in thanking you for calling this hearing on an incredibly important subject. i a
other sub budgets and a permanent energy. domestically, we have a much higher unemployment rate in 1968. we have more poverty absolutely and relatively and 1968. we certainly have more home foreclosures and more consumer debt. of course, 30 million workers are making today less than the workers made in 1968 adjusted for inflation. that is why we're launching this national drive to overpower congress and split the republicans in congress, organized and what the democrats, so tens of billions of dollars are poured into the community, into the long deserved pockets of these people, many of whom have children and they don't have health insurance or paid sick leave or big vacations. but they deserve $10.50 minimum wage, which is what it would be in 1968. no big deal. >> explain how that would work, how does an increase in the minimum wage actually work? >> 1, congress can pass it for all of the states. there is no competition between the states that way in terms of wage levels, no competition between businesses, etc. everyone would have to pay the same minimum wage. the other way is what has
drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and industries, we must claim its promise. that is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure -- our forests and waterways, our crop lands and snow-capped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care by god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared. we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [applause] our brave men and women in uniform, tempered by the flames of battle, are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we're also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into t
, two of the three americans killed in this horrific attack on that energy facility in the algeria. i'm joined by ambassador john bolton, former u.n. ambassador and fox news contributor. good morning . what do you make of leon panetta's comments? what do they mean to you. >> i think he is right on target. they sound like comments from a man who is about to leave the obama administration which he is. the president in his inaugural address said a decade of war is ending. when he accepted the democratic presidential nomination on september 6th. he said al qaeda is on the road to defeat. five days later, ambassador chris stevens, three other americans, killed in libya. we see the french in operation in mali against an air i can't -- area that al qaeda terrorists carved out the size of texas. as you mentioned this terrible hostage-taking in algeria where there are at least 37 dead and quite likely more. the war on global terrorism is far from over. and so secretary panetta may want to talk to the president about that. >> what we've seen, the war against terrorism and the obama administrati
that with the consent of the senate i will do everything in my power, summon every energy and all of my focus to build on her record and on the president's vision. senator mccain, as i mentioned, is a long-time friend. we met here in the senate coming from very different political positions and perspectives, but, you know, we found common ground. i'll never forget standing with him in hanoi, in the cell, in the hanoi hilton in which he spent a number of years of his life, just the two of us, listening to him talk about that experience. i will always be great full for his partnership in helping to make real peace with vietnam by stabbing the most significant process in the history of our country, or of any country, for the accounting of missing and dead in any war, and then for working to lift the embargo and ultimately normalize relations with an old enemy. john had every reason to hate but he didn't. and instead we were able to help heal deep wounds and end the war that had divided too many people for much too long. as we talk about war and peace and foreign policy i want all of us to keep in our min
in education and research and development, innovation. to get control of the energy future. all of that will be a part of the president's vision for the next four years. >> you know, bob schieffer mentioned earlier this morning the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, the president is proposing a number of changes to the gun laws in this country. how much a part of the president's resolve will that be in the months coming? >> well, the thing -- the president always said that, you know, you have to do many things at once when you're president, and that's a very important thing. we can't keep replicating these tragedies and it's not just the big tragedies, but the small, smaller strategy dtragedies than the streets every day. so he's determined to move forward on this package of laws. they're not the only things we need to do. some of the things have less to do with government and more to do with what we -- what we do in our home. what our children play and in terms of video games and what they watch. but certainly we need to do something about guns. we are hopeful that we're at a mom
energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot seed to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and is new industries. we must claim its promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our nation treasure. our forests and waterways, our croplands and snow capped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet. commanded to our care by god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared. we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual wool. our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens feared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price it has paid for liberty, the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turn sworn enemies t into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time, as wel
? >> it boosts your immune system and gives you energy. >> mustard, is there an advantage to mustard? >> there actually is. it helps with aches and pains. make a paste out of it, rub it on your sore muscles. >> you are making that up sh. >> i am not. >> you like pork as opposed to chicken? >> nice alternative. i look for tenderloin because really, truly, you can't mess it up. you brown these pork tenderloins, pound each in the pan, get a nice, golden color. >> whoa! and you drop it on your co-host over here. >> sorry, it slipped. put it in the oven at 400 degrees for 30 minute until it's nice and tender inside. >> okay. >> and then what you do is in the same pan, we'll lower the heat a little bit so you don't get covered. start with a little bit of honey. go ahead and do that. dump it all in there with shallots. little garlic, shallots, honey, mustard, red wine vinegar, couple of tablespoons and a little bit of white wine. we're basically going to cook this down for a couple of minutes until it thickens slightly. you get sort of a sweet and tangy sauce. which i happen to love. you fi
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